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Get some Sea Fin Teak oil By Dalys if you can find it on the East coast. It's for sail boat decks. Really good UV protection.
It's used just like Watco. You just slop it on, let it set for about 10 or 15 minutes and wipe and buff. I think it would work great on your lamp.

JW

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Ennio Moricone, the amazingly prolific Italian composer who penned the scores for Segio Leone's 1960s Spaghetti Westerns -at the very least- and scored as many as 500 film in total, has died. A few years ago, I had actually bought tickets to see him perform. He was scheduled to do 3 gig this side of the Atlantic Ocean: one in Mexico City, one in Los Angeles, and one at the new (at that time) Barclays Center in Brooklyn. At a cost of about 375.00 per ticket, these were indeed, BY FAR, the most expensive concert tickets I ever purchased. Alas, Mr Morricone had had surgery, I believe back surgery- and his physician advised him not to travel. Hence, all 3 performances were cancelled! Dan, it would have been so great to witness him with a 200 person orchestra and choir!

Here's the full NYT obit, from which I quoted in the shout box:

ENNIO MORRICONE NYT OBIT

Now I guess I have some films to see!

Last edited by ricochetrider; 07/06/20 12:48 pm.

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The Mission main theme (Morricone Conducts Morricone)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oag1Dfa1e_E

Great music for a great movie.

Last edited by Hugh Jorgen; 07/06/20 12:56 pm.

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Listened to a great overview about him and his work on NPR on the drive to work this morning. Really good and interesting life he had.


"Back in the garage with my [***] detector
Carbon monoxide making sure it's effective...
----THE CLASH-----

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I love that he would compose scores while sitting at his desk! No need to sit at a piano; he’d write the charts and hear them in his mind’s ear.


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[email protected] man, Charlie Daniels also died in the past couple days. I fell away from him in his later life as a country music "star", but his early work was big in my world, specifically, the record Fire On The Mountain- his song "Trudy" (call up trudy on the telephone) plays in my head on a regular basis, for some inexplicable reason. I saw the Charlie Daniels Band live on many occasions back in the mid to late 70s, and they were a very solid act. But he had also worked (out of Nashville) on 3 Bob Dylan records and played with and produced Roy Buchanan as well (with Billy Price singing, too BTW). EDIT seems Mr Daniels also worked with Leonard Cohen somewhere along the line too- he really got around back in the day!


Last edited by ricochetrider; 07/07/20 1:16 pm.

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14 July 2020

had a bit of a ride on the Airhead RS. Hot as blazes but whatever. Didn't take too many photos although I did take the digital camera along, just for a lark.

back'ards:

[Linked Image from ricochetridersmotomojo.zenfolio.com]

forwards:

[Linked Image from ricochetridersmotomojo.zenfolio.com]

sideways:

[Linked Image from ricochetridersmotomojo.zenfolio.com]


the "old" Laughlin Mill, built approximately 1763- pretty old for this neck of the woods, older by nearly 100 years than most of the "old" stuff around here.

[Linked Image from ricochetridersmotomojo.zenfolio.com]

[Linked Image from ricochetridersmotomojo.zenfolio.com]

[Linked Image from ricochetridersmotomojo.zenfolio.com]

[Linked Image from ricochetridersmotomojo.zenfolio.com]

Rode a mix of fast 2 lane state roads and tiny, slow, back country lanes. Covered 249 KMs so about 154 miles which seems to be about par for the course here lately.

Stopped for ice cream instead of beer, must be getting old laughing
Sorry, no pix of the ice cream, my bad. laugh

Cheers, hope everyone is well.

Last edited by ricochetrider; 07/15/20 7:21 pm.

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Originally Posted by Dick Page
Is that old mill somebody's house now?

Dick, it doesn't appear to be. The historic mill is a bit of a public shrine in a tiny town. It's not open, but folks can park on the grounds to fish or whatever.


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Hey so any of you with [email protected] accounts may know there a thing going around for a while (probably still is going) called something like "the 10 album challenge". Our own @jubeeprince tagged me in it, so I "had" to get on the bandwagon. So I'm 63 now, been listening to rock and roll all my life. I had to really dig deep to sort out a handful of records that were more than just generally impactful. I had a lot of fun in this, and in the end, put a LOT of thought into my album choices. I thought it'd be fun to post this here too, what the heck, right? I'm doing the copy/paste thing to get my text from each post in here.

1st album: Abby Road

(Steve Prince) tagged me in the “top 10 albums” challenge, so um yeah, wow where to start?
My musical rock and roll journey began with The Beatles when I was in 2nd or 3rd grade- a friend’s older sister had every record, both 45s & albums, of any and every band from the early/mid 1960s going forward.
While I could really post any Beatles album to start with, the one record that had a major, life altering impact on me, that I can pin to one song in one moment-

was Abby Road.

In summer 1969 our family had moved to Newport, Rhode Island for my Army dad’s year-long stint as a student at the Navy War College. It was here that I heard so many great records - many in school where my music teacher would have us bring albums in to listen to and discuss each Friday!
BUT having been groomed by Dixie Curtis’ impressive rock and roll record collection, I was already a big music fan on my own- even if my tastes weren’t as refined or eclectic as some of my school peers.
My first taste of Abby Road came when I happened into a “head shop” in downtown Newport one day. “She’s So Heavy” was playing and at that very moment, I knew definitively, what it was I liked in a rock and roll song. I was 12. To this day that song evokes the same deep feelings in me as it did then.

[Linked Image from ricochetridersmotomojo.zenfolio.com]

2: King Crimson's In The Court Of The Crimson King

I heard King Crimson’s debut album immediately after its release in 1969. For me and for many others it was both eye opening & mind bending. The opening track, 21st Century Schizoid Man was and remains one of the single most formative songs I ever heard and to this day would totally rank in my top 5 songs of all time.
But to go from the all out mayhem of this track into... well the whole rest of the record, really? There is nothing else like it, and this album went on to be one of the most talked about and influential records of all time.

Again, that 1st track formed, in my young brain, THE vision and the expectation of what a great rock and roll song should be. The rest of the record is simply pure, great music. It is also probably fair to say- and important to mention that this record introduced me to jazz and to the avant garde- both genres of which I became more and more into as I grew and expanded my capacity for ingesting various forms of music (and art).
King Crimson went on to be a super dynamic band, and they were always a part of my world as I grew up. They were super active tourers and recorded so much if not all of their shows over the decades- much of which is readily available via Robert Fripp’s website. I’ve been lucky to see them perform on 2 occasions, and would love to see them again sometime soon- they have been on the road a lot lately, doing U.S. tours regularly.

[Linked Image from ricochetridersmotomojo.zenfolio.com]

3: Woodstock

We were living in Rhode Island in 1969 and Woodstock took place not real far away. When the record hit, I was introduced to a bunch of bands I’d never heard of before- some of which went on to be my favorites for quite a while- namely Santana, Ten Years After & Canned Heat.
Artists like Crosby Stills & Nash, Arlo Guthrie & Richie Havens, Jefferson Airplane, and The Who also stayed pretty high on my list of likes, and Country Joe & The Fish’s epic Fish Cheer was like a battle cry! By the time Woodstock II was released, I had found Mountain and the fact they played Woodstock helped to further them in my estimation.

Over the years, and I mean to this day- I’m still finding out people who played this epic festival- like Johnny Winter, to name but one of my all time favorite artists who made neither the albums or the film! Woodstock may have been “only” 3 days but that moment in time has stretched on throughout my whole life (well to date anyway) and continues to surprise and entertain all these years later.


[Linked Image from ricochetridersmotomojo.zenfolio.com]

4: Mahavishnu Orchestra, Birds Of Fire

I missed Mahavishnu Orchestra’s first record but Birds Of Fire came into awareness in the crew I was hanging out with in 10th or 11th grade.
While I’d never heard of John McLaughlin, I did already know Jerry Goodman- a wild wild electric violin player whose band The Flock had made the rounds in some earlier circles I had been in a year or so prior.

The Mahavishnu sound was electrifying and magical, coming off the heels of John McLaughlin’s stint with Miles Davis in his electric fusion days. It took me a while to really “get it” with these guys, but I’ve gone on to be a big fan of John McLaughlin.
Jan Hammer of course had his own rise as did Billy Cobham, in the “new” world of fusion jazz as that genre became more mainstream. Jan Hammer of course played with Jeff Beck over the years- who also influenced me considerably as a guitar player I admired tremendously- and who broke his own ground in the realm of fusion jazz a couple years after Birds Of Fire with his record, Blow By Blow. Billy Cobham, one of the few drummers I ever knew of whose playing was being referred to as “musical”, put out a record called Crosswind in 1974 and that was the first jazz fusion record I ever bought. Way later in life- like just 10 years ago- I got into Miles Davis and explored the work Mr McLaughlin did with him. I saw John McLaughlin play live in Orlando back in 1978 or so, with his band Shakti, a completely amazing group of players that included the stunning violinist, L. Shankar- no apparent relation to the sitarist Ravi Shankar. Interestingly, as an aside, the opener that night for Shakti was none other than the great Roy Buchanan! So that particular show was quite the bill, indeed.

Suffice it to say this band and the first members of its first incarnation stayed with me and have taken me down many different roads over the course of my lifetime. Again, I’m still finding out about work that some of these guys have done, for example just a couple months ago I found out that Billy Cobham played in Bob Weir’s band Bobby & The Midnights! To this day, although I own a bunch of John McLaughlin records and a couple Mahavishnu records, I’ve never owned a copy of Birds Of Fire.

Maybe it’s about time.

[Linked Image from ricochetridersmotomojo.zenfolio.com]

5: JJ Cale's Naturally

At age 15, in 10th and 11th grade, I was hanging out with a handful of Army guys who had been drafted. We were all at Fort Leonard Wood in Missouri- my dad was a brigade commander there and these guys were all doing what was called “short time”- serving out their required military duty, having returned to U.S. soil after fighting in Viet Nam. These guys were a few years older than me- and a heck of a lot wilder. They survived the war, and definitely partied their way through their tours of duty in VietNam. They all had nice stereos and they turned me into so much music! I can go on about it all and at least one more record from this period in my life may make it into my list-
BUT

This first record from JJ Cale hit and I heard it probably not too long after it came out. I took me a while to really appreciate JJ Cale’s down tempo style. It wasn’t exactly hard rock but in the mode du jour, was accepted just as any other record or band would have been, and I mean from folks like Country Joe McDonald & Arlo Guthrie or Bob Dylan to Deep Purple and Steppenwolf. People’s ears were wide open and we didn’t have all these micro niches.
Competition for my attention was pretty stiff just then; records that came out about that same time included David Bowie’s Ziggy Stardust, and Steely Dan’s debut record, Can’t By A Thrill, to name just 2. JJ Cale rose higher and higher into my realm of awareness and I came to really appreciate his entire thing. I must have been in good company, because songs off this first record were covered by Eric Clapton, Kansas, & Waylon Jennings. Another band who covered his later work was someone you might have heard of: Lynyrd Skynyrd- who covered Call Me The Breeze on their 2nd record. Eric Clapton covered a 2nd JJ Cale song: Cocaine. JJ Cale went on to make many more records. I’ve heard most of them and each is as good as the next.
Sadly, I never had the chance to see him play live.

[Linked Image from ricochetridersmotomojo.zenfolio.com]

6: Pink Floyd, Ummagumma

Pink Floyd was a big part of my life before their release of Dark Side. I first heard Meddle, and the first record by them I ever bought was Obscured By Clouds. Much later on, I got into their really early works from the mid 1960s. But Umma Gumma was a record that not only stuck with me, it introduced me to “sounds” as music. This record had a big mixed bag of stuff- from live songs, to nice mellow music to just plain experimental noise. It opened the door for me to the world of the avant garde in music and art and performance. In short Umma Gumma expanded my consciousness and horizons. It’s influence stays with me to this day.

[Linked Image from ricochetridersmotomojo.zenfolio.com]



to be continued

Last edited by ricochetrider; 07/16/20 3:17 pm.

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OK the 8th record in my line-up of influential albums is...

Edgar Winter's White Trash's live record, Roadwork

I can’t even say how I ended up with this Edgar Winter’s White Trash “Roadwork” album in my collection when I was 15 or so. But it spun my head around with its rockin soul & blues vibe. The epic long version of Tobacco Road was amazing and this was my first music of Edgar’s brother Johnny Winter, who puts in a guest appearance- that I ever heard. There’s a big blend of great tunes here with a fantastic band. It was far quite different from
most of what I was listening to at that time- but Tobacco Road and Still Alive And Well saw some heavy rotation on my turntable! I went on to be a lifelong fan of Edgar & Johnny Winter, seeing both of them many times live. Incidentally, this was also the 1st time I ever heard Rick Derringer.

[Linked Image from ricochetridersmotomojo.zenfolio.com]

my 9th post was a 3 record smash-up post with Wishbone Ash's Pilgrimage, Uriah Heep's Salisbury, & Deep Purple's In Rock

Wishbone Ash had epic twin guitars and sweet melodies. I was a huge fan of those guys for years- their twin guitar harmonies were and remain great. The first record by them I heard was Pilgrimage. Their 1st record, titled simply "Wishbone Ash", and Argus saw some serious turntable time in my life as well over the years.

[Linked Image from ricochetridersmotomojo.zenfolio.com]

Deep Purple’s In Rock turned my head around and between them and Steppenwolf, my love for hard rock was set in stone, you might say. A couple years later, Deep Purple records Machine Head and Live In Japan saw some heavy air time with me and the gang I was hanging with.

[Linked Image from ricochetridersmotomojo.zenfolio.com]

Uriah Heep’s Salisbury was a departure for me but those guys went on to play a big role in my teenage years- staying with me all through high school. Some of my best ever summer days were spent in the wilds of south central Missouri with Uriah Heep in the 8 track player. In spite of the whole British Invasion thing that had already happened,Uriah Heep was a distinctly English band with a strong "otherworldly" vibe!

[Linked Image from ricochetridersmotomojo.zenfolio.com]

10: Fleetwood Mac, Bare Trees

Fleetwood Mac was a band I had first gotten into earlier with their relative “hit” Oh Well about 1970, but that was as far as I got with them until
a couple years (or so) later when their record Bare Trees was a staple in a friend’s collection of 8 track tapes we’d listen to when hanging out in her parents van and running around in the wilds & back roads of the Ozark Mountains.

The songs were (and are) great and their brand of folksy, guitar driven rock was just perfect for our backwoods adventures. A couple of the songs here, Bob Welch’s Sentimental Lady and Spare Me A Little Of Your Love had long legs and were staple tunes for a long time going forward, with Spare Me A Little in use for some time in the band’s touring repertoire, and Sentimental Lady being remade a few times in Bob Welch solo career projects over time.
Going both forward and backward from Bare Trees in Fleetwood Mac’s album list there are a lot of sweet spots- and this is a band that I love to this day.

They had many personnel changes over the years but always, they had great guitar players- with Bob Welch, Danny Kirwan, Peter Green, and Lindsay Buckingham in their line-ups over the decades. Their last tour- in 2019 featured Mike Campbell from Tom Perry’s Heartbreakers so they managed to continue that tradition into the 21st century.

Their first few records were straight up blues records, and Peter Green penned Black Magic Woman! In 1968 Fleetwood Mac released it as a stand alone single; it was put on a following record the next year. The song was made famous by Santana, on their 2nd album Abraxas.
Fleetwood Mac had some high and low points over the years but by and large their catalog of records is pretty solid, much of their music holds up well, and some of their songs are a major part of the soundtrack for my generation.

[Linked Image from ricochetridersmotomojo.zenfolio.com]

Ok my final post, number 11, was another triple play with 3 records that were all interconnected in some way or ways: David Bowie's Ziggy Stardust And The Spiders from Mars, Mott the Hoople's All the Young Dudes, & Lou Reed's live Rock & Roll Animal.

This is another 3-pack and these records tie together in many ways. Ziggy Stardust and All The Young Dudes came out around the same time and I heard them both almost immediately. Tho vastly different from one another, they both came out strong.
Ziggy Stardust’s complex layering of tracks on top of tracks on top of tracks was a ground breaking achievement and is still mind blowing to listen to decades later. David Bowie was of course, amazing in every way- and I was very fortunate to get to see him live on 2 occasions. This record also firmly establishes Mick Ronson as an amazing tour de force in his own right.

[Linked Image from ricochetridersmotomojo.zenfolio.com]

All The Young Dudes has a much more organic, down tempo feel. Ian Hunter’s writing and singing are great, the band lays it down solidly, and the whole record is pretty amazing- and again, sounds as great today as it ever did- in fact I have it on vinyl and the recording is awesome! There’s a cover of the song Sweet Jane- the first time I ever heard a Lou Reed song. David Bowie wrote the title track & produced this record. He also plays sax on track 5. Mich Ralphs, a founding member of Mott the Hoople of course, left the band to found Bad Company with Paul Rodgers- not a bad career move, really. This and other work slots him right up there among the top tier of rock & roll hierarchy. Ian Hunter is, of course, amazing! What a great front man he always was.

[Linked Image from ricochetridersmotomojo.zenfolio.com]

Lou Reed’s Rock And Roll Animal came out several years later- in 1974. This amazing release absolutely blew me right out of the water! The twin guitar onslaught of Steve Hunter & Dick Wagner was strong and on point- and remains as strong now as ever. These two players would go on to be in an Alice Cooper band and continue their onslaught in grand style. Steve Hunter came out of a Mitch Ryder band called Detroit and is widely considered to be one the greatest contributors to rock and roll. The dark feel of this record is down to it being mostly covers of Velvet Underground songs. That said the overall effect of the record is stunning and spectacular. A writer for rolling stone magazine said of the performance at the time:
“The band does not emulate the violent, hypnotic, dope-trance staccato power and subway lyricism of the Velvet Underground, but rather opts for a hard, clean, clear, near-royal Mott the Hoople/Eric Clapton (Layla) opulence”
This I did not know until just now reading the Wiki page on the record- but I feel it totally justifies my choice to link these 3 records into a single post. When the opening track kicks off- the soaring instrumental intro to Sweet Jane, it sends chills down my spine still.

[Linked Image from ricochetridersmotomojo.zenfolio.com]

Incidentally, a 4th record that is worth a mention here is the sequel to Rock & Roll Animal- Lou Reed Live. Both records were recorded at a single live performance by Lou Reed and his very special band.
Additionally notable: the song from Ziggy Stardust, “It Ain’t Easy” (a Ron Davies tune) appeared also on Mitch Ryder’s album (with band of the same name), Detroit. Steve Hunter (of Lou Reed's live band) played in the band and on that song, so there’s another tie-in!

All three of these records spun me around and expanded my horizons by considerable margins. Lou Reed Live is also a joy but I came into it much later on so it could not be said to have had as important an impact on me.


++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
******************************************************************************************
>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
..............................................................................................................................

Hey so what a load of fun I had in compiling this list of influential albums. It really was a "trip" back in time, and I had as much fun reliving some of the seminal moments in my life as I had in concentrating enough to compile this list. I want to also say that many of these records still perform well, holding up just as strong all these years later, if not stronger than ever, today. I still listen to many of them on vinyl and/or CD, although some have fallen away.

Cheers, everyone. Stay tuned for more "boredom".


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Too much to quote so I'll just refer to each.
Abbey Road: I bought that album when I was maybe 14. Used to sing it to myself while I did my morning paper route. I also love the White Album. I played Revolution Number 9 backwards, turn me on dead man!
I came to appreciate Crimson later. I still love 21st Century Schizoid Man and Epitaph, but Starless and Bible Black is more to my taste. Cigarettes, Ice Cream, figurines of the Virgin Mary. Bruford is one of my favorite drummers. I also love the '80s incarnation with Adrian Belew.
We all listened to Woodstock and took our girlfriends to see the movie. Never bought that album, but I recently got the recording of Johnny Winter at Woodstock. Don't know why they left him out of the album.
Never really got into Mahavishnu. I had Zappa and DiMeola for machine-gun guitar riffs. Tommy Bolin too.
We all had the quad headphone experience with Dark Side of the Moon with some serious chemical aids. Today the only Floyd I have is Meddle and Obscured by Clouds. I was more into ELP, only quad concert I ever saw.
I had DP In Rock for a short time until my dad made me return my order from Columbia Record Club. Heard all the later stuff at a friend's house. I really love the comeback albums from the 90s with Gillan back on vocals.
I was also late to appreciate Bowie, though one of my best friends really idolized the dude. We spent a lot of drunken nights singing Hang on to Yourself, etal.
Bowie really made Mott into a great band. I have some early albums, and they really sucked before Dudes. The only thing that bothers me about that album is that it sounds as if they left the Dolby off when they mastered it, really cheesy high end. We all used to do this with cassettes to get more high end out of the playback, but it kinda ruins the recording for me. Really great live show in '74, probably the loudest band I've ever seen, including The Who.
Rock and Roll Animal, what can I say I used to use Sweet Jane to introduce myself to new neighbors. Now I use Live at Leeds. I saw Lou in Atlanta in the late '80s. Didn't have Steve Hunter with him but Lou can flat play guitar himself.
I was a big fan of Steppenwolf, first concert I ever attended. Until my older brother brought home Aqualung. My high school marching band played an arrangement of Thick as a Brick. I saw the premier of Passion Play in Knoxville in '73. Best concert I ever saw.
First album I ever bought was Are You Experienced. I found a reissue a couple of years ago. First LP I played in the new house. Amazing what can be done with 'only' 8 tracks!


Knowledge speaks. Wisdom listens.

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Gees,
THis is getting weird
We actually studdied "In the Court of the Crimson King " in my final year of high school .
Have all of Crimson on an open reeler & listen to it regularly .
Zappa was not allowed because of the naughty word, so I have the complete set including cruising with Ruben & the Jets & Shut up & play yer gituar .
If he was not such a brillant musician he would have made an excellent urban philosopher.
Lou Reid was maditory but I got into things like Fripp & Eno ( follow on from Crimson )
Zappa got me into the Dah dah musicans so Edgar Varaise was then only one I could find on LP's
Zappa also got me nto Jean La Ponte which led into acid Jass & the Soft Machine.
Amazed there are others with similat tastes.


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Originally Posted by BSA_WM20
Gees,
THis is getting weird
We actually studdied "In the Court of the Crimson King " in my final year of high school .
Have all of Crimson on an open reeler & listen to it regularly .
Zappa was not allowed because of the naughty word, so I have the complete set including cruising with Ruben & the Jets & Shut up & play yer gituar .
If he was not such a brillant musician he would have made an excellent urban philosopher.
Lou Reid was maditory but I got into things like Fripp & Eno ( follow on from Crimson )
Zappa got me into the Dah dah musicans so Edgar Varaise was then only one I could find on LP's
Zappa also got me nto Jean La Ponte which led into acid Jass & the Soft Machine.
Amazed there are others with similat tastes.

My favorite Zappa album is Hot Rats but Apostrophe, Overnight Sensation, Zoot Allures, and Roxy & Elsewhere rank too. Got to see Zappa 2 times, great shows, both. First time was on the Zoot Allures tour, like 1977, maybe? Halloween night in the old Spectrum in Philly. What an arena that was. Saw many magical shows in there back in the day.

I knew Jean Luc Ponte (sp?) before he played with Frank. Saw him once too, at an old Opera House. Amazing show.

I was deeply into electric fusion jazz. Hanging out with musicians will take you to places you might not get to on your own.

Weather Report was big on my list and to this day I listen to them regularly. Heavy Weather & Mysterious Traveler are as solid and relevant today as ever. Saw them twice over the years- and also had the great pleasure to see Jaco Pastorius playing bass with Herbie Hancock! I loved Alphonso Johnson but Jaco added his own level of energy that few could have matched. Always thought Weather Report was 100% Joe Zawinal's band but Jaco really tried to usurp him. If you haven't seen the Netflix doc on Jaco, it's worth a look.

Oddly, I never heard any of that electric Miles Davis stuff from Bitches Brew onward, until 10 or so years ago!

Last edited by ricochetrider; 07/18/20 9:03 pm.

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First time I heard Jaco was on an Ian Hunter album, All American Alien Boy.
I only got to see Frank once, kinda slim pickings for concerts in Knoxville. That was pretty much the Live in NYC show, Roy Estrada wore a ski mask during Illinois Enema Bandit.


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Just for fun.
I saw all of thr Zappa concerts in Sydney from all 3 tours ( crashed them all )
The overnite sensation concert will always be top in my list because some clot lit a roman candle in the audience.
He stopped the show till the idiot was tossed out, Abused him let right & center ( rightfully so )
When it came time for Saint Alfonsos he call signed the word Marjurine in tribute to the idiot
M is for a moron who lights a bomb in a crowded theatre
A is for Arsehole
etc etc etc.
Always hoped it would make it into one of the anthology albums but no suck luck .

Now we had a pretty good trad jazz player, Kerrie Biddle & her band "The Hottest Band in Town " were the opening act for Zappa's one only concert in Albury a sort of anally retentive town on th NSW Victoria border.
The town fathers were rather concerned than "The Hottes Band in Town " might be a bit risqué for the nice clean God fearing folk of Albury so they cancelled her appearance and allowed double bill for that nice sounding band "The Mothers of Invention".
The mayor tried to stop the show mid the second number & the audience rioted .

But probably the best concert I ever went to ( mostly because I was very young ) was Herbie Mann at the Sydney Opera house.
Now entertainment staff go into double time at 11 pm so most shows finish at 10 pm.
Herbie & the full Sydney orchestra cam back & did 3 more numbers by which time it was 10:30 so the lights went on & the orchestra walked out.
Herbie sat at the mike and played solo till 11 when the power got cut off so he did another hour acoustic till the police came and dragged him off the stage.

Not far from the Opera House ws a dive called, naturally "The Basement " where they played mostly modern-progressive-acid jazz.
The house band for a long while was Galapagos Duck which was a different line up to the touring band.
If you can find a copy of Ebony Quill, it is worth the effort.Ebonoy Quill on You tube.
The Basement was the 1st & 2nd basement of a mostly derelect building and wereboth lower than high tide level on Sydney harbour.
More than once I can rememberbeing there as the harbour back flowed up the drains so the seated area in front of the stage was 2' deep.
Being acoustic ( like jazz should be ) the band kept on playing and we just stood on the chairs or sat in the sea water depending upon the state of intoxication


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I saw Zappa Plays Zappa once and can say it is totally worthwhile to go see Dweezil Zappa and an all star band made up of FZ alumni, playing full versions of Frank Zappa songs. Dweeil, no slouch at guitar himself, said he had to pretty much relearn the instrument before he could play his father's compositions!


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I figured out the oddity behind Zappa's guitar playing. He was a drummer before picking up guitar. A lot of his lead riffs are 13 stroke rolls played on another instrument.
The latest I ever saw a concert end was the '73 Jethro Tull Passion Play show. From what I've read, Knoxville was the first place they ever played that show, having rehearsed for a few days at the UT music department auditorium. They played until 12:30. Knoxville being in "right to work" country, I doubt they were subject to double-time rules for the local crew.
My first year in Atlanta I went to a blues festival in Piedmont Park. John Mayall was the headliner. About 10:30 he said, "They're closing the park at 11. We're staying at the Marriott. C'mon over, we'll be jamming late." I went over to the hotel and sure enough John sat in with the house band. Had to be a big thrill for those guys.
That's one thing I miss about living in Atlanta. Virtually any band on tour is gonna play there. Very often one can see semi-major acts playing in smaller venues, even bars. I got to see Ian Hunter with Mick Ronson at a punk bar.


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Got some film scans in my inbox from the photo lab yesterday. Here are some nice shots from that vintage flat track race Wade & I went to a few weeks back

Hugh Mackie's 500cc flat tracker

[Linked Image from ricochetridersmotomojo.zenfolio.com]

[Linked Image from ricochetridersmotomojo.zenfolio.com]

and his 750

[Linked Image from ricochetridersmotomojo.zenfolio.com]

around the grounds

[Linked Image from ricochetridersmotomojo.zenfolio.com]

[Linked Image from ricochetridersmotomojo.zenfolio.com]

[Linked Image from ricochetridersmotomojo.zenfolio.com]

look for more later


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A few more of my film photos from around the grounds of this dirt track out in rural Pennsylvania. All these are 35mm photos shot onFuji Industrial 100 color film, a film stock that's a Japan-only release. I buy it off eBay, have shot a fair amount of it, and really like the way it renders color.

[Linked Image from ricochetridersmotomojo.zenfolio.com]

[Linked Image from ricochetridersmotomojo.zenfolio.com]

basically nobody came out early in the day for the vintage race portion of that day's program- just a few race teams and near zero spectators

[Linked Image from ricochetridersmotomojo.zenfolio.com]

[Linked Image from ricochetridersmotomojo.zenfolio.com]

[Linked Image from ricochetridersmotomojo.zenfolio.com]

[Linked Image from ricochetridersmotomojo.zenfolio.com]

Last edited by ricochetrider; 07/29/20 6:08 pm.

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these are the last of my medium format shots from that day at the flat track races, also in color- shot with my Hasselblad 500cm on Kodak Ektar 100 film. Ektar really shines in some instances and you can sure see the film in all its glory in these first 2 photos!

[Linked Image from ricochetridersmotomojo.zenfolio.com]

[Linked Image from ricochetridersmotomojo.zenfolio.com]

[Linked Image from ricochetridersmotomojo.zenfolio.com]


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Went to some drag races couple weeks back also, and shot a few rolls of film, although mostly I shot 35mm as I jammed a lens on my medum format camera!
frown

But here's some 35mm stuff I shot, from roll numero uno. People were racing all kinds of things, from funky OLD 40s cars to modifieds and funny cars, to stockers and snowmobiles and rails with what I THINK were snowmobile motors fitted. Fun stuff- and not a bad turn-out for a small time, local drag strip! One guy I'm getting to know brought a handful of cool old cars, one of which was outfitted with an old International Harvester tractor engine! I'll upload some of my phone pix from the day and put them up too, in a bit.

[Linked Image from ricochetridersmotomojo.zenfolio.com]

[Linked Image from ricochetridersmotomojo.zenfolio.com]

[Linked Image from ricochetridersmotomojo.zenfolio.com]

[Linked Image from ricochetridersmotomojo.zenfolio.com]

[Linked Image from ricochetridersmotomojo.zenfolio.com]

[Linked Image from ricochetridersmotomojo.zenfolio.com]

[Linked Image from ricochetridersmotomojo.zenfolio.com]

OK here's the phone pix from the drags. Fist off is the tractor powered car. I asked the guy about it and specifically about the 3 carburetors because obviously, the tractor didn't come equipped with triple carbs. He said he made the manifold for them. I hope to get up to this dude's shop some time to interview him and shoot some of the work he's doing. He shows up at all the drag and dirt track/jalopy stuff around Pennsylvania and always has a handful of cool vintage cars with him.

[Linked Image from ricochetridersmotomojo.zenfolio.com]

[Linked Image from ricochetridersmotomojo.zenfolio.com]

[Linked Image from ricochetridersmotomojo.zenfolio.com]

[Linked Image from ricochetridersmotomojo.zenfolio.com]

[Linked Image from ricochetridersmotomojo.zenfolio.com]

[Linked Image from ricochetridersmotomojo.zenfolio.com]

People watching was great at this event. I did manage to take some film photos of a few folks. I was a little worried about going over there but everyone was mindful of each other's space and most were wearing masks as they moved ar round the pits and stuff. It was a GREAT day. out. The drags were sponsored by a local vintage Motor Racing Museum. Here's a link to them, they have a massive annual calendar but this summer its a bit curtailed due to the pandemic.

Eastern Museum of Motor Racing

The museum is not far from Wade & Gerry's house down south of here. A bunch of us went over there to see the place some years back but since they have remodeled and expanded a bit. I need to get back over there to see the place now.

Last edited by ricochetrider; 07/29/20 7:01 pm.

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Not to be picky, but thats not a tractor motor. Green Diamond International Harvester motors were in K series trucks in the 1940s. The triple manifold is way cool though.

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AH! Thanks for the clarification Zimm. thumbsup


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This photo, from Dieter (@expresidente) and my trip from Hamburg north, to attend the Norwegian BSA Inter, popped up in my [email protected] b00k feed today as a “memory”. This photo, which has always been a favorite of mine, was taken in Denmark at a beach called Fyns Badestrande. This shot was originally in 4:3 format but today I cropped it to a square, which I think suits it nicely.

Let me know what y’all think.

[Linked Image from ricochetridersmotomojo.zenfolio.com]


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...several photos that are really good. Mostly medium format with those incredible colors and contrast...making plenty of other digital images dull in comparison.

Regarding your choices about popular Music; I only say that seems that I lived in a parallel non mainstream World since forever.
I mean; not bad choices but...

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