Classic British SparesKlempf British PartsBaxter CycleBritBike Sponsor SteadfastCyclesSRM EngineeringLucas Classic MotorcycleHepolite PistonsIndustrial tec supply

Upgrade your membership to: Premium Membership | Gold Membership | Life Membership | Vendor Membership | Site Sponsor Membership
Welcome to BritBike Forum!
Britbike forum logo
Member Spotlight
Norri Robertson
Norri Robertson
Glendale AZ USA
Posts: 70
Joined: August 2008
ShoutChat
Comment Guidelines: Do post respectful and insightful comments. Don't flame, hate, spam.
Search eBay for motorcycle parts in following countries
Australia, Canada, France, Holland, Italy, United Kingdom, USA
Previous Thread
Next Thread
Print Thread
Page 1 of 3 1 2 3
#830144 11/17/20 9:31 pm
Joined: May 2006
Posts: 569
Likes: 1
B
bmwr90s Offline OP
Britbike forum member
OP Offline
Britbike forum member
B
Joined: May 2006
Posts: 569
Likes: 1


1973 Norton Commando
1991 FLHTC W/SIDECAR
Support Your #1 BritBike Forum!

Check out British motorcycles for sale: British Motorcycles on e-Bay UK, British motorcycles on e-Bay North America
Joined: Feb 2005
Posts: 7,209
Likes: 58
Britbike forum member
Offline
Britbike forum member
Joined: Feb 2005
Posts: 7,209
Likes: 58
Fantastic . I have recently watched every WW2 documentary on Netflix that they have .... Its become an obsession I achieved my dream of having a BSA SxS 12 gauge and now I want a BSA WW2 armament of some sort... Not sure what I want or even what I can afford.... What Ive seen on gun auctions is crazy expensive .... I don't necessarily need a tank buster for 15,000 but something interesting would do wink


http://wadeschields.tumblr.com/

Jack of all trades . Master of fun! wink

Beer is not the Answer.... Its the Question..... The answer is YES

[Linked Image from i.postimg.cc]
Joined: Oct 2008
Posts: 6,834
Likes: 89
Britbike forum member
Offline
Britbike forum member
Joined: Oct 2008
Posts: 6,834
Likes: 89
Very nice.
The only pictures my dad brought back were from the Nuremberg trials. He ended his service as a guard and darkroom tech there.
For some reason they wouldn't let him bring his B.A.R. home, but I got his souvenir Luger. laugh


Knowledge speaks. Wisdom listens.

71 A65L "Zelda"
92 BMW K100rs "Gustav"
72 T120V cafe project "Mr. Jim"
72 T150V "Wotan"
Joined: Feb 2011
Posts: 3,537
Likes: 35
Britbike forum member
Offline
Britbike forum member
Joined: Feb 2011
Posts: 3,537
Likes: 35
Surprisingly I have a few good pictures and artifacts of my Dad during WW2. Here is one of him at the landing at Nassau Bay New Guinea in 1943 where he had a protection ring of Australian infantry and the second picture is an observation post in the Owen Stanley range of New Guinea. He liked his Thompson and wearing his hat on the side of his head.


Bill B...


[Linked Image from i.postimg.cc]


[Linked Image from i.postimg.cc]


Boomer
1 member likes this: wadeschields
Joined: Aug 2001
Posts: 3,155
Likes: 55
Britbike forum member
Offline
Britbike forum member
Joined: Aug 2001
Posts: 3,155
Likes: 55
Originally Posted by DavidP
Very nice.
but I got his souvenir Luger. laugh

I have a Lugar my father brought back in 45 too. I remember asking him when I was young how he got it. He told me he traded a pair of pilots sunglasses for it, but years later he told my brother "the guy I got it from didn't need it anymore" and that's all he would say.
The thing that always strikes me when looking at these type of pictures is how much older than their years these guys look. Most are probably in their early 20s at best but look as though they have lived a lifetime already.


1960 BSA A10
2007 Suzuki Bandit
1957 A10
(Used to be a Triumph here)
71 Norton Commando
17 Triumph Bonneville

Joined: Jul 2001
Posts: 13,713
Likes: 78
Well'ard Rocker
Offline
Well'ard Rocker
Joined: Jul 2001
Posts: 13,713
Likes: 78
Originally Posted by MikeG
Originally Posted by DavidP
Very nice.
but I got his souvenir Luger. laugh

I
The thing that always strikes me when looking at these type of pictures is how much older than their years these guys look. Most are probably in their early 20s at best but look as though they have lived a lifetime already.

This dude ....

[Linked Image from photos.smugmug.com]

is Oberleutnant zur See Hans-Georg Hess, who commanded U-955 from October 1944 to May 1945, at the age of 21, and won the Knight's Cross of the Iron Cross for sinking 6 ships.

It's been a long time since I met a 21-year-old who could even wipe his own arse, much less command a warship in combat. It's what happens when there's a war on ....

Lannis


"Why do you wear that thing, Dobby?" "This, sir? 'Tis a mark of the house-elf’s enslavement, sir."
1 member likes this: Bob E
Joined: Dec 2013
Posts: 5,745
Likes: 128
DOPE
Offline
DOPE
Joined: Dec 2013
Posts: 5,745
Likes: 128
Originally Posted by Boomer
Surprisingly I have a few good pictures and artifacts of my Dad during WW2. Here is one of him at the landing at Nassau Bay New Guinea in 1943 where he had a protection ring of Australian infantry and the second picture is an observation post in the Owen Stanley range of New Guinea. He liked his Thompson and wearing his hat on the side of his head.


Bill B...


[Linked Image from i.postimg.cc]


[Linked Image from i.postimg.cc]

those two photographs are spectacular.

images like this of ordinary people involved in extraordinary history are priceless. the fact that they are identifiable with human family links adds to their value immeasurably.

Last edited by kevin; 11/18/20 6:14 pm.
1 member likes this: Boomer
Joined: Aug 2001
Posts: 5,380
Likes: 32
R
Britbike forum member
Offline
Britbike forum member
R
Joined: Aug 2001
Posts: 5,380
Likes: 32
"I have a Lugar my father brought back in 45 too. I remember asking him when I was young how he got it. He told me he traded a pair of pilots sunglasses for it, but years later he told my brother "the guy I got it from didn't need it anymore" and that's all he would say."

My former neighbor when I lived in PA had a Luger he brought back. I heard about it, but never saw. He was in declining health and was definitely showing early signs of dementia, but liked to play poker on Friday nights. One Friday night, the neighbors had invited us over to play poker. It always involved a few beers. Woody (the neighbor) was having a tough night playing poker and coping in general. He was hitting the beer fairly hard.

All of a sudden, he lost his confused looks and become very clear in his speech and thoughts, said he needed show me something and tell me a story.

He left the room and came back with a Luger wrapped in a white towel. Along with the Luger was 2 magazines, a holster, mag pouch, and a single round wrapped in a white handkerchief. He unwrapped it, and the handkerchief had a name embroidered in German.

Woody was in the infantry, part of the 3rd Army. He was leading his squad into a French farm house to see if it was clear. He kicked the door open and was greeted by a German officer who was wounded who immediately raised his Luger to fire. Woody did what he had to do. The round in the white handkerchief was the round that was in the chamber. The handkerchief was in the officer's pocket.

Woody had never told his family that story until that night. He had always told them it didn't matter how he ended up with the Luger.

After Woody passed several years later, the Luger disappeared. None of his family claimed to have any knowledge of what happened to it.


Never underestimate the human ability to elevate stupid to a whole new level!.
2 members like this: wadeschields, Boomer
Joined: Feb 2011
Posts: 3,537
Likes: 35
Britbike forum member
Offline
Britbike forum member
Joined: Feb 2011
Posts: 3,537
Likes: 35
Interesting that the first picture was unknown to me or my family until I went to the 2018 Australian BSA Inter Rally and we took a visit to the Shrine of Remembrance in Melbourne. After a tour inside we ended up talking to a tour guide at the gift shop and she pointed out a book that was about the invasion of New Guinea and guess what the picture was on the cover. Needless to say I bought 10 copies.


[Linked Image from i.postimg.cc]


Bill B...


Boomer
3 members like this: wadeschields, MikeG, Bob E
Joined: Nov 2007
Posts: 154
Likes: 4
T
Britbike forum member
Offline
Britbike forum member
T
Joined: Nov 2007
Posts: 154
Likes: 4
Absolutely Lannis,
I was watching a TV documentory the other day when the narrator casually dropped out the fact that the esteemed Mr R J Mitchell was 24 when he designed the legendary Spitfire... I choked on my cup of tea at that!

No wonder evereyone 'then' looks older than their years - they had all lived lives already!

Joined: Jul 2001
Posts: 13,713
Likes: 78
Well'ard Rocker
Offline
Well'ard Rocker
Joined: Jul 2001
Posts: 13,713
Likes: 78
Originally Posted by Boomer
Surprisingly I have a few good pictures and artifacts of my Dad during WW2. Here is one of him at the landing at Nassau Bay New Guinea in 1943 where he had a protection ring of Australian infantry and the second picture is an observation post in the Owen Stanley range of New Guinea. He liked his Thompson and wearing his hat on the side of his head.


Bill B...

I have pictures if I can find them of my father-in-law in North Africa and the Pacific with the Army Air Corps. He was a farm boy from Charlotte County, VA, probably never been out of the county when he went to war, and here he was on ships and airplanes traveling the whole world over.

Your Dad was a bold soldier - you had to be up close and personal for a .45 ACP Thompson to be effective. I believe I'd tote a Garand and be able to stand off a bit!

Lannis


"Why do you wear that thing, Dobby?" "This, sir? 'Tis a mark of the house-elf’s enslavement, sir."
1 member likes this: Boomer
Joined: Dec 2013
Posts: 5,745
Likes: 128
DOPE
Offline
DOPE
Joined: Dec 2013
Posts: 5,745
Likes: 128
i believe it to be a sad commentary on human culture that killing people in warfare is somehow applaudable, while killing them on the sidewalk is somehow a forbidden act.

given that, those people who did th ebest they could with what they were given deserve the best accolades that history can offer. none of us get to choose the times we live in, and neither do we get to choose the moral dilemmas we are expected to solve.

2 members like this: ricochetrider, Mike Baker
Joined: Feb 2011
Posts: 3,537
Likes: 35
Britbike forum member
Offline
Britbike forum member
Joined: Feb 2011
Posts: 3,537
Likes: 35
Originally Posted by Lannis
[

Your Dad was a bold soldier - you had to be up close and personal for a .45 ACP Thompson to be effective. I believe I'd tote a Garand and be able to stand off a bit!

Lannis



He did do some bold actions, or crazy acts, fine line by definition. I'm certainly glad he survived these actions or I wouldn't be here.


[Linked Image from i.postimg.cc]


[Linked Image from i.postimg.cc]


Bill B...


Boomer
2 members like this: Bob E, Nick H
Joined: Oct 2008
Posts: 6,834
Likes: 89
Britbike forum member
Offline
Britbike forum member
Joined: Oct 2008
Posts: 6,834
Likes: 89
AFAIK My dad got his Luger when they "liberated" a German supply depot, they did a lot of that towards the end of the war. I checked the history based on the markings. It was first made to be sent to Spain for the Riff insurrection. That contract was cancelled and the pistol ended up issued to rural police in Prussia. I assume that the pistol and its owner got drafted. Still shoots well, though a bit picky about ammunition.
He came home with some other pistols, but the Luger is the only one left after a burglary when I was too young to remember.
Dad started out with a Garand, went into the middle of The Bulge. About a week in the B.A.R. gunner was killed. Dad had scored sharpshooter in boot camp so he got stuck with the B.A.R.. Lucky he survived, those guys were a prime target.
Late in the war I can see a 21 year old U-boat captain. By 1945 they were down to old men and adolescents. My mother related to me that once, when they were touring Germany, their waiter commented on the Hitler Youth, "Ya, they were like your Boy Scouts." My father scolded him, "They were no Boy Scouts, I had to fight those little SOBs!"
If he kept any pictures I never saw them. I think dad wanted to forget the whole experience.


Knowledge speaks. Wisdom listens.

71 A65L "Zelda"
92 BMW K100rs "Gustav"
72 T120V cafe project "Mr. Jim"
72 T150V "Wotan"
Joined: Dec 2013
Posts: 5,745
Likes: 128
DOPE
Offline
DOPE
Joined: Dec 2013
Posts: 5,745
Likes: 128
my grandfather rode an indian in france as a dispatch rider with the signal corp.

i still have his crossed flag collar pins.

i wish that that he hadn't had to wear them. there's no civilized excuse for war.

its very existence is an acknowledgment that civilization has broken down.

1 member likes this: BSA_WM20
Joined: Feb 2011
Posts: 3,537
Likes: 35
Britbike forum member
Offline
Britbike forum member
Joined: Feb 2011
Posts: 3,537
Likes: 35
Okay, last posting I promise. I need to get a shadow box made.


[Linked Image from i.postimg.cc]


Bill B...


Boomer
2 members like this: Rusty Goose, Bob E
Joined: Dec 2013
Posts: 5,745
Likes: 128
DOPE
Offline
DOPE
Joined: Dec 2013
Posts: 5,745
Likes: 128
uour images of your father will stay with me now, permanently.,

i have shared them with my children.

war is serious. i don't like it, but i can't eliminate it either.

Last edited by kevin; 11/19/20 6:27 am.
Joined: Feb 2011
Posts: 3,537
Likes: 35
Britbike forum member
Offline
Britbike forum member
Joined: Feb 2011
Posts: 3,537
Likes: 35
Originally Posted by kevin
uour images of your father will stay with me now, permanently.,

war is serious. i don't like it, but i can't eliminate it either.


As they have with me, he died from his WW2 disabilities when I was 5 yrs old. But I am only one of thousands that are of like mind.


Bill B...


Boomer
Joined: Jul 2001
Posts: 13,713
Likes: 78
Well'ard Rocker
Offline
Well'ard Rocker
Joined: Jul 2001
Posts: 13,713
Likes: 78
Originally Posted by kevin
i wish that that he hadn't had to wear them. there's no civilized excuse for war.

its very existence is an acknowledgment that civilization has broken down.

In that case, "civilization" has never been anything but broken, because there's never been a time when there have been no wars, not in recorded history.

It only takes one side to start one; people who don't believe in it and don't want to fight still have to fight sometimes. Like walking down the street; I might be peaceful and pacific and loving everyone, but when someone steps out with a knife, there go THOSE ideals ....

Lannis


"Why do you wear that thing, Dobby?" "This, sir? 'Tis a mark of the house-elf’s enslavement, sir."
Joined: Sep 2002
Posts: 620
Britbike forum member
Offline
Britbike forum member
Joined: Sep 2002
Posts: 620
The longest period of (relative) peace in Europe was during the Roman empire, for about 200 years.

Joined: Sep 2013
Posts: 2,942
Likes: 75
Q
Britbike forum member
Offline
Britbike forum member
Q
Joined: Sep 2013
Posts: 2,942
Likes: 75
Quote
The longest period of (relative) peace in Europe was during the Roman empire, for about 200 years.

very relative
Pax Romana is a Roman point of view .
during this time of peace
there was a 4 year war to subjugate the tribes in Dalmatia ... where an estimated 1million
Various Dalmatian factions fought against Roman occupation .

There were two Wars across the Danube River into Dacia , not missions of peace or trade
they Where to steal gold mines .

there were 3 rebellions in Palestine that were not peaceful for the jews , the ones that lived , became displaced persons .

The Romans invaded the island of Britain during the time of Pax Romana

Germanic tribes ambushed , killed or enslaved 16 to 20,000 Roman soldiers fully halted Roman expansion into tribal areas

and the Romans fought a six-year war in Armenia , where the Armenians , or whatever they were called at the time ,
beat the Roman Legions to a standstill .

Last edited by quinten; 11/19/20 9:28 pm.
Joined: Aug 2001
Posts: 471
Likes: 1
K
Britbike forum member
Offline
Britbike forum member
K
Joined: Aug 2001
Posts: 471
Likes: 1
My mom’s brother was at Saipan. Japanese soldiers told the civilians of all the terrible thinks Americans would do to them if caught. They threw there children off the cliffs to the rocks below, and jumped after them.


1968 BSA Firebird
1200 HD
XS 1100
1972 Rickman 125
Joined: May 2004
Posts: 4,719
Likes: 53
B
Britbike forum member
Offline
Britbike forum member
B
Joined: May 2004
Posts: 4,719
Likes: 53
It says a lot about or for the cultures who do not believe in possessions and see themselves as the caretakers of the planet .

Possesions are the down fall of all western cultures


Bike Beesa
Trevor
Joined: Jan 2014
Posts: 1,213
Likes: 81
N
Britbike forum member
Offline
Britbike forum member
N
Joined: Jan 2014
Posts: 1,213
Likes: 81
Originally Posted by BSA_WM20
It says a lot about or for the cultures who do not believe in possessions and see themselves as the aretakers of the planet .

Possesions are the down fall of all western cultures

Very philosophical Trevor, but i don't know of a culture that sees itself that way when they have experienced
living in a civilised culture. They all want more and once they see a way to get it, they chase it.

NickL #830691 11/22/20 11:20 pm
Joined: Apr 2006
Posts: 3,451
Likes: 57
Britbike forum member
Offline
Britbike forum member
Joined: Apr 2006
Posts: 3,451
Likes: 57
Originally Posted by NickL
Originally Posted by BSA_WM20
It says a lot about or for the cultures who do not believe in possessions and see themselves as the aretakers of the planet .

Possesions are the down fall of all western cultures

Very philosophical Trevor, but i don't know of a culture that sees itself that way when they have experienced
living in a civilised culture. They all want more and once they see a way to get it, they chase it.

The 19th century French anarchist Pierre-Joseph Proudhon is quoted as saying that all property is theft


Blessed are the curious for they shall have adventures

"He knows not where he's going,
For the ocean will decide,
Its not the destination,
It's the glory of the ride"
(Edward Monkton, Zen Dog)

Bryan
who does not do politics


Joined: Jul 2001
Posts: 13,713
Likes: 78
Well'ard Rocker
Offline
Well'ard Rocker
Joined: Jul 2001
Posts: 13,713
Likes: 78
Originally Posted by BeezaBryan
Originally Posted by NickL
Originally Posted by BSA_WM20
It says a lot about or for the cultures who do not believe in possessions and see themselves as the aretakers of the planet .

Possesions are the down fall of all western cultures

Very philosophical Trevor, but i don't know of a culture that sees itself that way when they have experienced
living in a civilised culture. They all want more and once they see a way to get it, they chase it.

The 19th century French anarchist Pierre-Joseph Proudhon is quoted as saying that all property is theft

We had a guy like that.

"Imagine no possessions ... it's easy if you try ...."

I think he had about $300,000,000 when he died. So much for despising property. I'll bet the French dude wouldn't like it much if someone came and took all HIS stuff ... ! Theory and poetry and philosophy are great, but when you start messing with people's "stuff", that's the end of THAT!

Lannis


"Why do you wear that thing, Dobby?" "This, sir? 'Tis a mark of the house-elf’s enslavement, sir."
Joined: Oct 2008
Posts: 6,834
Likes: 89
Britbike forum member
Offline
Britbike forum member
Joined: Oct 2008
Posts: 6,834
Likes: 89
Property is not the problem, it's the lust for other people's property.
Just as it's not money, but the love of money which is the root of all evil.


Knowledge speaks. Wisdom listens.

71 A65L "Zelda"
92 BMW K100rs "Gustav"
72 T120V cafe project "Mr. Jim"
72 T150V "Wotan"
3 members like this: oilyamerican, kevin, BSA_WM20
Joined: Apr 2015
Posts: 1,228
Likes: 34
D
Britbike forum member
Offline
Britbike forum member
D
Joined: Apr 2015
Posts: 1,228
Likes: 34
Belief systems and ignorance are at the root of most armed conflicts.

NickL #830757 11/23/20 10:50 am
Joined: May 2004
Posts: 4,719
Likes: 53
B
Britbike forum member
Offline
Britbike forum member
B
Joined: May 2004
Posts: 4,719
Likes: 53
Originally Posted by NickL
Originally Posted by BSA_WM20
It says a lot about or for the cultures who do not believe in possessions and see themselves as the aretakers of the planet .

Possesions are the down fall of all western cultures

Very philosophical Trevor, but i don't know of a culture that sees itself that way when they have experienced
living in a civilised culture. They all want more and once they see a way to get it, they chase it.

Go and have a long talk to some of the local black fellas .
Now my only experience with the indiginous population was the 4 years I lived in Redfern and of course these were urbanised .
Very generous people when they had money and expected you to return that generosity when they had none.
I had to walk around 3 blocks to avoid walkig past a pub where some locals I had become friends with drank.
Pension week I got dragged in no way to leave before closing & hand never needed to go into pocket .
Off week I would be expected to return the hospitality and buy everyone drinks till the pockets were empty or the pub closed .
And material possesions really were shared. The one guitar would be played by dozens of peopled during the night and the owner did not care.
you wanted to play & they did not feel like it so have a strum.
Motor vehicles were the same & my kombi did more miles with one of them behind the wheel than me .

And I would really like to know how you define civilised ?
Driving tanks through a Islamic country flying religiously offensive christian flags ?
Buying a factory because the land is worth more than what they produce, sacking everyone knowing that many will be forced into poverty ?
paying your self a massive bonus then filing for bankruptcy and shafting your creditors to the tune of $ 900,000 as Briggs & Stratton just did while moving the factory to another state because you can pay the workers less for doing the same work there ?


Bike Beesa
Trevor
Joined: Oct 2012
Posts: 5,486
Likes: 61
knuckle head
Offline
knuckle head
Joined: Oct 2012
Posts: 5,486
Likes: 61
You are simplifying the Briggs and Stratton situation.


79 T140D, 96 900M Ducati ,61 A10 .On a bike you can out run the demons..
“But I don't want to go among mad people,” Alice remarked. “Oh, you can't help that,” said the Cat: “we're all mad here. I'm mad. You're mad.
Joined: May 2007
Posts: 11,366
Likes: 82
Moto Mojo
Offline
Moto Mojo
Joined: May 2007
Posts: 11,366
Likes: 82
Originally Posted by bmwr90s
Hello, Art! Nice to see you posting here, how ya doin these days?


"It is no measure of health, to be well adjusted to a profoundly sick society."

Joined: Jan 2014
Posts: 1,213
Likes: 81
N
Britbike forum member
Offline
Britbike forum member
N
Joined: Jan 2014
Posts: 1,213
Likes: 81
'Pension day'
'Pubs'.
'Kombi'
'Guitar'
All indigenous products eh?

Your experience is different from mine. Lets leave it at that.

Joined: May 2006
Posts: 569
Likes: 1
B
bmwr90s Offline OP
Britbike forum member
OP Offline
Britbike forum member
B
Joined: May 2006
Posts: 569
Likes: 1
Hi Tom, just keeping my head down, keeping clear of the next firestorm beginning in 2021. Down to 2 bikes, probably going to sell the Norton next. Love the bike but my bones are getting to brittle to chance riding it anymore. Anyway, thanks for asking and hope everything's all good with you.

Art


1973 Norton Commando
1991 FLHTC W/SIDECAR
1 member likes this: ricochetrider
Joined: Oct 2012
Posts: 5,486
Likes: 61
knuckle head
Offline
knuckle head
Joined: Oct 2012
Posts: 5,486
Likes: 61
The photos of the Japanese are memorable, especially the few shwing them smiling...


79 T140D, 96 900M Ducati ,61 A10 .On a bike you can out run the demons..
“But I don't want to go among mad people,” Alice remarked. “Oh, you can't help that,” said the Cat: “we're all mad here. I'm mad. You're mad.
Joined: May 2004
Posts: 4,719
Likes: 53
B
Britbike forum member
Offline
Britbike forum member
B
Joined: May 2004
Posts: 4,719
Likes: 53
Originally Posted by Hillbilly bike
You are simplifying the Briggs and Stratton situation.

So what part of setting aside $ 13,000,000 for executive payouts which was more than the defaulted loan repayment , not paying the $ 900,000,000 to creditors or shifting the main factory from Wisconsin to NY is over simplification ? .
I appreciate protecting their loans by buying Murray , Victa & Simplicity because they were all likely to go bust put a stretch on finances.

But paying yourself knowing that there will be no money to pay the pensions of workers who have been loyal to you for generation is not civilised , over here it is criminal .


Bike Beesa
Trevor
Joined: Oct 2012
Posts: 5,486
Likes: 61
knuckle head
Offline
knuckle head
Joined: Oct 2012
Posts: 5,486
Likes: 61
Originally Posted by BSA_WM20
Originally Posted by Hillbilly bike
You are simplifying the Briggs and Stratton situation.

So what part of setting aside $ 13,000,000 for executive payouts which was more than the defaulted loan repayment , not paying the $ 900,000,000 to creditors or shifting the main factory from Wisconsin to NY is over simplification ? .
I appreciate protecting their loans by buying Murray , Victa & Simplicity because they were all likely to go bust put a stretch on finances.

But paying yourself knowing that there will be no money to pay the pensions of workers who have been loyal to you for generation is not civilised , over here it is criminal .
So why would they move to NY with taxes and wages equal to Wisconsin . Do you know why? Briggs aquired Ferris and Snapper commercial mowers that are manufactured in NY. Then Moved the production to a bigger facitly in a nearby town..
You should include why this all happened instead of concentrating on the corporate greed. Briggs and Stratton main small engine business was the lower end equipment that was being primarily sold by high volume home improvement stores. The big stores starting dictating the prices they would pay, take or leave it. Briggs cut costs anyway they could...Not an excuse but just what happened.


79 T140D, 96 900M Ducati ,61 A10 .On a bike you can out run the demons..
“But I don't want to go among mad people,” Alice remarked. “Oh, you can't help that,” said the Cat: “we're all mad here. I'm mad. You're mad.
Joined: Jul 2001
Posts: 13,713
Likes: 78
Well'ard Rocker
Offline
Well'ard Rocker
Joined: Jul 2001
Posts: 13,713
Likes: 78
Originally Posted by Hillbilly bike
The photos of the Japanese are memorable, especially the few shwing them smiling...

It's always hard to break the barrier between an army made of individual soldiers following orders, realizing that they're just people in many ways, and at the same time not to have sympathy for the Australians when they realized that IF the Japanese got there, they would be tortured, raped, exploited and killed just like the Manchurians were ...

[Linked Image from photos.smugmug.com]

Nobody smiling there!

We don't often get to see both sides.

If you can find it, I highly recommend the short book "Shelters for the Self", which is a diary found on a Japanese-held island in the Pacific of a Japanese petty officer who kept a daily record of what was happening to them as they were gradually pushed off the island.

Lannis


"Why do you wear that thing, Dobby?" "This, sir? 'Tis a mark of the house-elf’s enslavement, sir."
Joined: Apr 2006
Posts: 3,451
Likes: 57
Britbike forum member
Offline
Britbike forum member
Joined: Apr 2006
Posts: 3,451
Likes: 57
In a small copse near the wharf where we sometimes leave our car when we go walking Cromford Canal

[Linked Image from i.postimg.cc]

Most people walk by without seeing this

[Linked Image from i.postimg.cc]


Blessed are the curious for they shall have adventures

"He knows not where he's going,
For the ocean will decide,
Its not the destination,
It's the glory of the ride"
(Edward Monkton, Zen Dog)

Bryan
who does not do politics


Joined: Oct 2012
Posts: 5,486
Likes: 61
knuckle head
Offline
knuckle head
Joined: Oct 2012
Posts: 5,486
Likes: 61
Originally Posted by Lannis
Originally Posted by Hillbilly bike
The photos of the Japanese are memorable, especially the few shwing them smiling...

It's always hard to break the barrier between an army made of individual soldiers following orders, realizing that they're just people in many ways, and at the same time not to have sympathy for the Australians when they realized that IF the Japanese got there, they would be tortured, raped, exploited and killed just like the Manchurians were ...

[Linked Image from photos.smugmug.com]

Nobody smiling there!

We don't often get to see both sides.

If you can find it, I highly recommend the short book "Shelters for the Self", which is a diary found on a Japanese-held island in the Pacific of a Japanese petty officer who kept a daily record of what was happening to them as they were gradually pushed off the island.

Lannis

On the other hand read Flyboys ,true story of tortue and cannibalism done by the Japanese to captured American airmen....Of course not all Japanese military were animals.......


79 T140D, 96 900M Ducati ,61 A10 .On a bike you can out run the demons..
“But I don't want to go among mad people,” Alice remarked. “Oh, you can't help that,” said the Cat: “we're all mad here. I'm mad. You're mad.
Joined: Oct 2008
Posts: 6,834
Likes: 89
Britbike forum member
Offline
Britbike forum member
Joined: Oct 2008
Posts: 6,834
Likes: 89
https://www.tnmagazine.org/former-german-soldier-recalls-life-at-crossville-pow-camp/
https://tennesseeencyclopedia.net/entries/pow-camps-in-world-war-ii/

The locals still call it Jap Camp, even though no Japanese prisoners ever stayed there. I think the camp was originally built to keep Japanese Americans.


Knowledge speaks. Wisdom listens.

71 A65L "Zelda"
92 BMW K100rs "Gustav"
72 T120V cafe project "Mr. Jim"
72 T150V "Wotan"
Joined: Sep 2013
Posts: 2,942
Likes: 75
Q
Britbike forum member
Offline
Britbike forum member
Q
Joined: Sep 2013
Posts: 2,942
Likes: 75
Allied prisoners-of-war in Singapore thanking their Australian liberators
[Linked Image from s3-eu-west-1.amazonaws.com]
Approximately 140 thousand Allied troops ,
British , Canadian
Indian , Australian
New Zealanders , Dutch
and Americans were held at more than 100 different Japanese work camps , as slave labor .
By the time of Japanese surrender
more than 30,000 POWs had died from starvation, disease, and mistreatment .

Joined: Aug 2001
Posts: 3,155
Likes: 55
Britbike forum member
Offline
Britbike forum member
Joined: Aug 2001
Posts: 3,155
Likes: 55
And on the other side of the coin we have this:

https://www.newenglandhistoricalsociety.com/a-german-pow-escapes-wwii-prison-camp-in-stark-n-h/

There is a book about the camp called Stark Decency, a good read if you can find it. It makes you wonder about the nature of national culture, especially in light of the camps that existed in Germany.


1960 BSA A10
2007 Suzuki Bandit
1957 A10
(Used to be a Triumph here)
71 Norton Commando
17 Triumph Bonneville

Joined: Oct 2012
Posts: 5,486
Likes: 61
knuckle head
Offline
knuckle head
Joined: Oct 2012
Posts: 5,486
Likes: 61
The Luftwaffe ran the POW camps for captured Allied airmen except for Russians....The majority of Luftwaffe were not Nazi party members. Generally speaking, the Germans treated them with some respect...However escapees were shot at...and there were food and supply shortages...The POW officers were housed separately from the enlisted men...And the enlited men could by Geneva convention be forced to do some labor..


79 T140D, 96 900M Ducati ,61 A10 .On a bike you can out run the demons..
“But I don't want to go among mad people,” Alice remarked. “Oh, you can't help that,” said the Cat: “we're all mad here. I'm mad. You're mad.
Joined: Jul 2001
Posts: 13,713
Likes: 78
Well'ard Rocker
Offline
Well'ard Rocker
Joined: Jul 2001
Posts: 13,713
Likes: 78
Originally Posted by Hillbilly bike
The Luftwaffe ran the POW camps for captured Allied airmen except for Russians....The majority of Luftwaffe were not Nazi party members. Generally speaking, the Germans treated them with some respect...However escapees were shot at...and there were food and supply shortages...The POW officers were housed separately from the enlisted men...And the enlited men could by Geneva convention be forced to do some labor..

I had an interesting first-hand account from a guy I worked with for years, Ed Luce. He was a US Army infantryman in December 1944, whose outfit was caught behind German lines during the German push in the "Battle of the Bulge". Either an "88" or a mortar shell landed in the middle of his rifle squad; when he came to, he was the only one left, his rifle was gone, and a German soldier standing over him. They took him prisoner and took him to a LuftStalag in northern Germany.

I asked him about life there. He said that the Germans were decent to the POWs. There wasn't a lot to eat, but everyone in the camp got three meals a day, which was more than most anyone else in northern Europe including German civilians (the coldest one in memory) had that year.

He told me "If you want to know what the camp looked like, put on an old episode of 'Hogan's Heroes'. Whoever was the consultant for setting up that camp had actually been in one, because it was perfect. The guard towers, the way the wire was strung, the prisoner barracks, the Commandant's offices, the furnishings, it was all identical to the one I was at ...."

In April 1945, the Germans took their weapons and vehicles and disappeared down the road, leaving the gate unlocked. The POWs took over the camp and awaited the ground troops .... Ed wore two hearing aids his whole life from that shell blast ... very interesting guy who lived through tough times.

Lannsi


"Why do you wear that thing, Dobby?" "This, sir? 'Tis a mark of the house-elf’s enslavement, sir."
Joined: Oct 2012
Posts: 5,486
Likes: 61
knuckle head
Offline
knuckle head
Joined: Oct 2012
Posts: 5,486
Likes: 61
In contrast is the treatment in Japanese a POW camps as described in the book Unbroken.. I consider the book to be one of the best stories of survival under brutal conditions...


79 T140D, 96 900M Ducati ,61 A10 .On a bike you can out run the demons..
“But I don't want to go among mad people,” Alice remarked. “Oh, you can't help that,” said the Cat: “we're all mad here. I'm mad. You're mad.
Joined: Dec 2013
Posts: 5,745
Likes: 128
DOPE
Offline
DOPE
Joined: Dec 2013
Posts: 5,745
Likes: 128
i grew up in southeast asia. the japaneze were hated there for their brutality during the war. even today i recommend that you do not the eat food in an american chinese reztaurant in the company of zomeone who is recognizably japaneze.

Joined: Aug 2001
Posts: 3,155
Likes: 55
Britbike forum member
Offline
Britbike forum member
Joined: Aug 2001
Posts: 3,155
Likes: 55
There is a recent film out called The Railway Man that gives a decent perspective of what it was like to be a prisoner of the Japanese. Came across it while channel surfing one night and was glad I did. A little bit different than the story told on Bridge On the River Kwai

Last edited by MikeG; 11/27/20 8:41 pm.

1960 BSA A10
2007 Suzuki Bandit
1957 A10
(Used to be a Triumph here)
71 Norton Commando
17 Triumph Bonneville

Joined: Oct 2012
Posts: 5,486
Likes: 61
knuckle head
Offline
knuckle head
Joined: Oct 2012
Posts: 5,486
Likes: 61
There are theories or truth that a lot of the horrible treatment of the Japanese to civililian and and POW's was rouge officers and not necessarily orders from higher up. and also the Bushido warriors code never to surrender and an enemy who surrenders is less than human. It's said than Japanese soldiers were beat during training to make them nasty..


79 T140D, 96 900M Ducati ,61 A10 .On a bike you can out run the demons..
“But I don't want to go among mad people,” Alice remarked. “Oh, you can't help that,” said the Cat: “we're all mad here. I'm mad. You're mad.
Joined: Aug 2001
Posts: 5,642
Likes: 111
Britbike forum member
Offline
Britbike forum member
Joined: Aug 2001
Posts: 5,642
Likes: 111
Where I grew up some of the Italian POWs became the ice creams shop folk, German Geordie worked the farms and taught me some new swear words. must dig out dads pics in France, he was a Black Devil, the tank has manhole covers welded on for extra armour ( Didnae work).


71 Devimead, John Hill, John Holmes A65 750
56 Norbsa 68 Longstroke A65
Cagiva Raptor 650
MZ TS 250
The poster formerly known as Pod
Joined: Dec 2013
Posts: 5,745
Likes: 128
DOPE
Offline
DOPE
Joined: Dec 2013
Posts: 5,745
Likes: 128
japanese naval and airforce cadets were brutalized in training.

also, in some places tge worst atrocitiez were at the hands of the occupation forces, not the frontline troops. in the philippines the eta --expatriate koreans in service to imperial japan-- had especially bad reputations. like the deathcamp kapos, they were themsvelves abused.

this does not excuze the japanez e frontline troops who terrorized nanking for some three months, murdering between 100000 and 300000 chinese civilians.
lookup rape of nanking for images tgat chinese photolabs duplicated of the japaneze zoldiers celebrating their victory.

Joined: Jan 2014
Posts: 1,213
Likes: 81
N
Britbike forum member
Offline
Britbike forum member
N
Joined: Jan 2014
Posts: 1,213
Likes: 81

Joined: Feb 2005
Posts: 7,209
Likes: 58
Britbike forum member
Offline
Britbike forum member
Joined: Feb 2005
Posts: 7,209
Likes: 58
[Linked Image from i.postimg.cc]

My Grandfather .. I wonder if there is any place to find out where he was wounded and other individual history of what his actual steps were? Also how do you get replacement medals? My uncles tell me that they only ever saw the Purple heart and believe that he may not have received the others in the first place??? Lost history ...

This is from the 47th Infantry website....

World War II:
The 47th Infantry Regiment was reactivated again on August 1st, 1940 at Fort Bragg, North Carolina.
In early November, 1942, in the campaign to secure the northern coast of Africa, the 47th Regimental Combat Team stormed the beaches of Safi, Morocco. The 47th continued across North Africa with the Allies in their successful campaign to drive the German armies from that continent.
Landing at Palermo, Sicily on August 1st, 1943, the Raiders swung into action one week later. On August 26th, Sicily was officially declared in the hands of the Allies.

On D-Day plus 4, June 10th, 1944, the 47th Infantry Regiment landed on Utah Beach in Normandy, France. By June 14th, 1944, combat patrols were in contact with the Germans and by nightfall of the 16th the 47th Regiment blocked the last escape route for the Germans in the Cotentin Peninsula. The famous port of Cherbourg was next and its capture is one of the brightest chapters in the 9th Infantry Division’s history. With the help of sister regiments the 47th Regiment laid siege to the city. Stubborn opposition greeted the Raiders, for the enemy held the high ground and other strategic positions. However, just after noon on June 25th, 1944, 2nd Battalion of the 47th Regiment became the first Allied troops to enter the city. Stiff resistance was encountered until the 28th of June, the day that Cherbourg fell. The 2nd and 3rd Battalions received Distinguished Unit Citations for their gallantry and heroism in the seizure of the city. For a few days the 9th Infantry Division’s operations halted for necessary rest and re-supply. The order to resume combat came on July 9th and soon elements of the 47th were in the midst of the “Battle of the Hedgerows”, one of the bloodiest battles and toughest encounters of the French campaign.

With the breakthrough at St. Lo the rush was on. Innumerable Allied units raced across France in pursuit of the retreating Germans. By August 1944, the 47th had forded the Seine River and headed for the Vesles and a memorable anniversary. It was in August 1918 that the 47th Regiment battled over the Vesles in a bloody crossing. Twenty-six years later the regiment crossed the river unopposed at the same point. In crossing they passed a monument erected to commemorate their heroic efforts in World War I.
Belgium was next for the 47th and they gained another first – this time they were the first Allied troops to set foot on Belgium soil in the drive for Germany. Then the long awaited invasion of Germany began. On September 14th, 1944, the Raiders breached the mighty Siegfried Line. Three days later the 47th became the first Allied unit to pierce the Siegfried Line.

Following the Battle of the Hurtgen Forest, the Regiment was directed to shift north and drive to the small town of Frenz, where they fought to capture the Frenzerburg Castle. Despite staggering U.S. losses, the town and castle fell. The 1st Battalion and Medical Detachment received the Distinguished Unit Citation for their action in the battle which punctuated 145 continuous days of combat for the Raiders. The German counter-offensive known as the “Battle of the Bulge” in December 1944 hit the 47th Regiment full force, but it repulsed the attacks and soon ripped open the way to the center of Germany. The famous Rhine River was now in sight and one of the most glorious chapters in the history of the U.S. Army was about to take place at the Ludendorff Bridge near the town of Remagen. This key span marked the spot where the first Infantry Regiment since the Napoleonic Wars battled across the Rhine. The 47th Regiment was forced to earn this distinction by engaging in some of the most savage warfare of World War II. The Germans showered the Ludendorff Bridge with shrapnel and shells. Through this wall of death, the 47th pushed forward and in March 1945 it established a bridgehead and held it against all attempts to dislodge them.

Finally, in the last week of April 1945, elements of the 47th Infantry Regiment and the 337th Russian Rifle Regiment joined ranks. The once mighty Third Reich had been defeated and among its conquerors stood the Raiders of the 47th Infantry Regiment!


http://wadeschields.tumblr.com/

Jack of all trades . Master of fun! wink

Beer is not the Answer.... Its the Question..... The answer is YES

[Linked Image from i.postimg.cc]
Joined: Jan 2006
Posts: 2,233
Likes: 24
Britbike forum member
Offline
Britbike forum member
Joined: Jan 2006
Posts: 2,233
Likes: 24
Most likely there are records of his service but it could take a lot of digging. My folks became interested in finding out what happened to my aunt's husband- a B17 pilot in the 385th bomb group. They spent many days at the 8th AF museum in Savannah over several years as they migrated from NY state to Florida for the winter. Got to know people there and were granted access to records that told the story. KIA over Belgium. Best part was they found out that my aunt was eligible for widow's benefits. 45 years after the fact. A nice windfall for an aging woman.

Page 1 of 3 1 2 3

Moderated by  bill50cal 

Link Copied to Clipboard
Job CycleBritish Cycle SupplyMorries PlaceKlempf British PartsPodtronicVintage MagazineBSA Unit SinglesBritBike SponsorBritish Tools & FastenersBritBike SponsorBritBike Sponsor






© 1996-2021 britbike.com
Powered by UBB.threads™ PHP Forum Software 7.7.5